Finnish education model – ‘Learning by Experience’ growing in India

Finnish education model – ‘Learning by Experience’ growing in India

In India, children wake up early, rush to school half-sleepy, rote-learn half of what is being taught, and then aimlessly complete their homework when they come back home. There is always a rush for good grades. However, the scenario seems to be slowly changing with the introduction of the Finnish model of education in India. The Finnish education system is very
different from the standardized ones followed in India, where government-appointed experts and agencies draw up a curriculum for the whole education system.

In Finnish model of education, students are being taught by using practical methods and are encouraged to use their common sense. It focuses on students’ well-being which helps in their holistic growth along with learning. Students count moving cars or trees to learn counting and calculations, sticks and stones are used to teach patterns and shapes, learn about soil by going to the fields and about measurements by making lemonade and much more.


When it comes to the learning assessment, Finland doesn’t have any formal examinations. Unlike Indian education system, students are assessed in more than one way to ensure real learning is happening instead of just getting grades. In addition to this, teacher training is one
of the key points of this education system as experts believe it is the educators who have the power to scrap the theoretical approach and help students learn in an engaging way.


The Finnish model of education is slowly growing in India – a country that has followed theory-based classes and has the toughest exams in the world. Experts are introducing the Finnish model of education right from the elementary classes in India. While some schools have adopted this method till Class 4, some have gone as high as Class 8. However, no school
in India has been able to adopt the Finnish model of education solely. Experts believe it is not possible to completely shift to this model of education in India. “Children will have to appear for the crucial board exams and compete for the entrance exams,” says Ashish
Srivastava, the CEO of Finland Education Hub.